Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Cloud9 New Block Block Hop - Finished Charity Quilt


Quilting Jet Girl, Puppilalla, Cloud 9 Blog Hop, New Quilt Block, modern quilt block, solid fabrics, charity quilt, orphan quilt
Quilting Jet Girl

Yvonne of ‘Quilting Jet Girl’ posted an up-date on last year’s lovely ‘Cloud 9 New Block Blog Hop’ blocks (that’s a mouth full). Yvonne, who was one of the fabulous hosts, finished combining the blocks into a charity quilt. Yay Yvonne! I think it is great to see some of the 65 blocks made together like that. There is mine! 'Stellar Flare' - second from the left in the second row from the bottom. =)


Quilting Jet Girl, Puppilalla, Cloud 9 Blog Hop, New Quilt Block, modern quilt block, solid fabrics, charity quilt, orphan quilt
Quilting Jet Girl
So much work went into that piece, so 'Thank you, Yvonne!' for all your hard work in relation to the blog hop and this quilt. You are fabulous! At the time it was said that the remaining blocks were also meant to be pulled together into another charity quilt by either one or both of the other two blog hop hosts Cheryl @Meadow Mist Designs and Stephanie @Late Night Quilter, but my research was unable to identify any progress reports on the fate of the remaining blocks. Happy to be advised if any of you have more information.



I though this might be an opportunity to do a quick online search to see, which of the block designs that had been thought up for the blog hop, had been taken up by the sewing community since the blog hop one year ago. I know mine hasn't been yet but others might have been.

Results:


Aha – OK I found that one of my blog hop library links to the tutorials is 'broken' because the domain in question is off-line but I will keep the link and wait whether the domain gets re-established.

I decided on a few search parameters, which were the below used in various combinations:
  • the designer's blog name
  • the designer's name
  • the block name
  • the fabric sponsor's name  

I also found that my research efforts were occasionally hampered by the fact that some designers did not name their blocks. The latter makes it somewhat challenging to follow up on the life and development of the blocks in question. Having said that, follow along to review my findings.

Block Parade:


Nancy J. over @All Points of the Compass tried and enjoyed making three of the blocks. Thanks again Nancy, for your kind permission to use the pictures here. =)

'Porthole' - Devoted Quilter

Porthole Quilt Block, Devoted Quilter, Puppilalla, modern quilting, Blog Hop, Sirrus Solids, cloud 9 fabrics,


'Sparkle' - Ants to Sugar

Puppilalla, modern quilting, Blog Hop, Sirrus Solids, cloud 9 fabrics, Sparkle Quilt block, Ants to Sugar,


'A Simple Life' - Late Night Quilter

Puppilalla, modern quilting, Blog Hop, Sirrus Solids, cloud 9 fabrics, Late Night Quilter, A simple Life quilt block



'Fractured Curves' - Carole Lyles Shaw

Carole's block was part of a block lottery of the Emerald Coast Modern quilt Guild. 

Carole herself developed a workshop based on her block earlier this year, which was called 'MidCentury Modern Curve – New Workshop!' and involved learning to piece a quarter circle curve without templates or pinning, and practicing improvisational cutting and piecing. Sounds good to me. =)

Puppilalla, modern quilting, Blog Hop, Sirrus Solids, cloud 9 fabrics, Fractured Curves, Carole Lyles Shaw



'Berry Cross' - The Inquiring Quilter

Jennifer Fulton also took matters into her own hand and offered a fun quilt along using her block 'Berry Cross'. Following the link you will end up at the link party, which takes you to all the pretty quilts that were made in the process. 

Puppilalla, modern quilting, Blog Hop, Sirrus Solids, cloud 9 fabrics, Berry Cross Quilt Block, The Inquiring Quilter
quilts by Liz Horgan, Margiestitcher and Susie,


'Mazarin' - Amista Baker

Following the blog hop Amista created her first quilt pattern based on her 'Mazarin' block design. Amista and her pattern testers sure created very pretty quilts with it. =)
 
Amista Baker, Mazarin quilt block, Puppilalla, modern quilting, Blog Hop, Sirrus Solids, cloud 9 fabrics
quilts by Amista, Whitney and Alicia Benn
 
 
'Anne’s Flower' - Tu-Na Quilts

I made 'Anne's Flower' for my sampler quilt where it will get to shine once I pull it all together. I can confirm that the instructions are easy to follow and the block comes together quickly. =)

Anne’s Flower, Tu-Na Quilts, Dresden Plate block, Puppilalla, modern quilting, Blog Hop, Sirrus Solids, cloud 9 fabrics



'Dragonfly' - Melva Loves Scraps
I imagine Melva's 'Dragonfly' block has an exciting future to look forward to. It has been published under the name 'The Damselfly' in the vol.15 Edition of Quiltmaker's 100 Blocks and has gotten made since as this little youtube video proves.

Dragonfly, damselfly quilt block, Melva Loves Scraps, Puppilalla, modern quilting, Blog Hop, Sirrus Solids, cloud 9 fabrics



'Star Thistle' - Twiggy and Opal

Jayne of course is an old hand at thinking up pretty blocks and seeing them made too. =) Her gorgeous 'Star Thistle' has been drawn up as a pattern proper and can be down-loaded from Craftsy. Her pattern testers sure created some tasty versions.

Star Thistle, Twiggy and Opal, Puppilalla, modern quilting, Blog Hop, Sirrus Solids, cloud 9 fabrics
quilts by Jayne, Katie @Katie Quilts and Isabelle @southbaybella


Oops, I guess today's post has gotten rather long (again) but I do love following up on projects. It is great to see what life of their own some of the block designs got to lead. I guess with the charity quilt all done and donated, the Cloud 9 Blog Hop can officially be considered concluded. Also today's point to take away is - Do not forget to name your blocks once you designed them! =)



https://quiltingjetgirl.com/2016-cloud9-new-block-blog-hop/




Tuesday, 5 September 2017

Stash Bee September Block - Oh Scrap





September Queen Amanda’s block choice is the exact opposite from my orderly and precise foundation paper piecing request last month. For her block she asked us to pull out our scraps to organically grow a block by matching scraps of similar sizes, combining away until you had a piece large enough to trim to 9 x 9 inches. We were to avoid browns and pastels. I succeeded on the first part but looking at my picture now, some fabric read more ‘pastel’ than Amanda might like. The good thing about this project is that she can just cut my blocks up and re-combine them with other pieces if she does not like what they currently look like.






 I have prepared one 9.5 x 9.5 inches block and an extra piece that is about 8 x 9 in size. They are already en route to Queen Amanda.




Stash Bee



Wednesday, 30 August 2017

One Impressive Beast of a Jacquard Loom

Have you ever been to Berlin, the one in Germany? And if so, have you been to the Technikmuseum in Berlin? It is a museum on technical and mechanical manufacture and in the entry hall of the museum, even before you enter the museum proper, there is a beautiful - BEAUTIFUL - 'Jacquard Loom' on display. I was instantaneously fascinated and have wanted to share it here with you since forever.  =)

Deutsches Technikmuseum


The Jacquard loom was invented by Joseph Marie Jacquard, was first demonstrated in 1801, and simplified the process of manufacturing textiles with complex patterns like brocade, damask and matelasse. The Jacquard loom was so called a power loom, which is a mechanised loom powered by a line shaft.



Jacquard Loom, webstuhl, Ribbon weaving, Puppilalla
side view


Wikipedia claims: 'A line shaft is a power driven rotating shaft for power transmission that was used extensively from the Industrial Revolution until the early 20th century. Prior to the widespread use of electric motors small enough to be connected directly to each piece of machinery, line shafting was used to distribute power from a large central power source to machinery throughout a workshop or an industrial complex. The central power source could be a water wheel, turbine, windmill, animal power or a steam engine. Power was distributed from the shaft to the machinery by a system of belts, pulleys and gears known as millwork'

Jacquard Loom, webstuhl, Ribbon weaving, Puppilalla
seen from above

Jacquard Loom, webstuhl, Ribbon weaving, Puppilalla



'The loom was controlled by a "chain of cards", a number of punched cards, laced together into a continuous sequence. Multiple rows of holes were punched on each card, with one complete card corresponding to one row of the design. Chains, like Bouchon's earlier use of paper tape, allowed sequences of any length to be constructed, not limited by the size of a card.' Fascinating stuff isn't it?

Jacquard Loom, webstuhl, Ribbon weaving, Puppilalla, mechanised weaving
rear view
Jacquard Loom, webstuhl, Ribbon weaving, Puppilalla
weights and counter weights


'Each position in the card corresponds to a hook, which could either be raised or stopped dependent on whether the hole was punched out of the card or the card was solid. The hook raised or lowered the harness, which carried and guided the warp thread so that the weft would either lie above or below it. The sequence of raised and lowered threads is what created the pattern. Each hook could be connected to a number of threads, allowing more than one repeat of a pattern.'

Jacquard Loom, webstuhl, Ribbon weaving, Puppilalla


This particular loom was built in 1920 in Wuppertal and is made entirely of wood and metal. It's measurements are as follows: lenght 5100 mm x width 2400 mm x height 3550 mm. As said above , it is an impressive beast of a loom. It was possible to weave either highly complex fabrics or up to 18 seperate ribbons at the same time (!). That is seriously sophisticated.

Jacquard Loom, webstuhl, Ribbon weaving, Puppilalla


'Jacquard's machine could weave fabrics 24 times faster than the draw loom generally in use then. Its introduction into the silk mills of Lyons created an uproar. Weavers were afraid of losing their jobs and there were fierce riots in the streets. The patent had to be taken on by the state to protect Jacquard's life.'

Jacquard Loom, webstuhl, Ribbon weaving, Puppilalla


The history around that invention is interesting and rather than reiterating it here, I would have you read this article, which gives you the entire backstory. I seriously could spent hours and hours prowling around this loom because its complexity and the ingenuity of its workings is nothing short of magnificent. 

So far so good, I hope you enjoyed this little peek into the foyer of the Technikmuseum in Berlin.   =)



Monday, 21 August 2017

Robin Round Two - Solid Teal-ometry

Round Robin Quilt, Puppilalla, Solids, Modern Quilt Design, Starter Block, Color Wheel, Patchwork, Foundation Paper Piecing





Welcome back to the Rakish Needle Round Robin. I cannot wait to show you what I have been working on. 

This round I got to work with Rachel’s starter block that had already been expanded upon beautifully by Ileana. (see below =) Rachel was looking for geometrical shapes and solids / tone-in-tone fabrics that read as solids. She also provided inspiring and fun sample pictures of quilt borders she liked. The aspect Rachel liked the most was the sense of movement that those borders conveyed. I though about that but decided that you needed a solid foundation before you could start adding this style of borders. True to that decision a whole yard of a teal solid went into making my additions. =)



Round Robin Quilt, Puppilalla, Solids, Modern Quilt Design, Starter Block, Color Wheel, Patchwork, Foundation Paper Piecing



The Inspiration Piece...




Checking my Instagram feed, I came across this picture of a #decohexpattern project, which sparked a ‘I-can-do-something-with-this’ reaction immediately. I bookmarked the entry and from there it took me 10 minutes to hash out what I wanted to do with Rachel’s top. I sat down with pen and paper to draw up my idea as a paper piecing template. It looked like hot mess but worked just fine. 


Round Robin Quilt, Puppilalla, Solids, Modern Quilt Design, Starter Block, Color Wheel, Patchwork, Foundation Paper Piecing


A New Block Design...

Round Robin Quilt, Puppilalla, Solids, Modern Quilt Design, Starter Block, Color Wheel, Patchwork, Foundation Paper Piecing













I designed a new block. What do you think? What shall we call it? Suggestions please. =)
I like how it looks and maybe I ought to add 'drawing it up as a template proper' to my ever-growing-never-ending to-do list for the future.

I then used the hexie blocks as ‘corner stones’ of my addition. I build on the idea of geometrical shapes but tried to keep it fun. I love how it looks even if some of the pieces turned out more wonky than I would have liked. 


Round Robin Quilt, Puppilalla, Solids, Modern Quilt Design, Starter Block, Color Wheel, Patchwork, Foundation Paper Piecing

Cohesion, cohesion, cohesion

Cohesion was easy to maintain this round. I just adopted colours from the colour wheel of the starter block, namely teal, yellow and purple and worked away with those. I also incorporated some colour graduation - or ombre effect if you prefer that term – with the different shades of purple and with the hexagons that have echoes in different shades of teal. So colour graduation too ties right back to the starter block. Very thoughtful right? =)

As soon as I had seen what Ileana had done before me, I wanted to retain the colourful barber pole candy stripes, so I made sure to add some as well. I think the quilt top so far overall really still looks as if one person had created the entire piece.



The Rakish Needle Robin, Round Robin Quilt, Puppilalla, Solids, Modern Quilt Design, Starter Block, Color Wheel, Patchwork, Foundation Paper Piecing


I had anticipated that we would need about six weeks for each of the initial robin rounds with the view to gradually extend the time frames. I had hoped to wrap up the round robin by end of November. That schedule is way out of the window. This second round robin round needed 3 months to be completed! As always there are some super fast participants and then some, whose life circumstances do not afford them the amount of time they ideally would like to dedicate to their sewing projects. 

And then there is the question of sewing mojo. I for example had a serious slump of motivation those past few weeks. Not because of this project, which I love and remain super excited about, but because of the beginning of Summer (or what wished to pass for it here in Berlin, rain, rain, rain – meh). I knew I would be tempted away from my sewing machine once the weather begged you to come outside and play. I suppose as long as everyone is still enjoying the round robin, the sedate pace should not be a problem. I am just secretly worried though that some members might get bored while others get stressed because they feel pressured. Yes, I tend to worry.

Back to this lovely piece. Unfortunately, Rachel quite likes how it looks, so I do not get to keep it - the more's the pity. =)

Next up I will be working with Karin's nightly firmament. Incidentally, Karin will be working on my piece at the same time. I guess we could hold each other to ransom to try to get a word in design wise - ha ha.